289: David Jou – Pomelo Fashion

289: David Jou – Pomelo Fashion

 

Podcast highlights:

  • [01:35] What is Pomelo Fashion? Where did it come from and what does it do differently in fashion and e-commerce?
  • [21:50] Does Pomelo sell their own brand and goods or are there concessions wherein they have designer brands in there? What is their inventory like?
  • [31:30] Pomelo's retail store also serves as a showroom for the goods and products. Is there a typical customer journey wherein one comes into the store, tries a product, goes home, checks it on their website and buys it?

Podcast notes:

  • [00:05] Welcome David Jou to Asia Tech Podcast Stories
  • [00:25] A little backstory on David Jou who was born in Dortmund, Germany, grew up in the USA and South Korea, speaks German, English and Korean, and being surrounded with talented people who speak English in Bangkok
  • [01:35] What is Pomelo Fashion? Where did it come from and what does it do differently in fashion and e-commerce?
  • [02:40] Pomelo is a DNVB, a digitally native vertical brand, and David wants to take on the Zara's and H&M's of this world. How does he compete with that?
  • [08:35] Traditionally, Zara had a weak online presence. Until very recently, you can't order online, so why would Zara not go online and fend off some competition? What is David's thought process on that?
  • [15:25] What is fast fashion? A style-agnostic idea focused on relevant fashion trends becoming popular in the market where Pomelo is present and the company tries to put together assortments based on the trends that are relevant at any given time
  • [17:35] Why did fast fashion emerge and designer brands got sort of pushed aside?
  • [21:50] Does Pomelo sell their own brand and goods or are there concessions wherein they have designer brands in there? What is their inventory like?
  • [23:30] Does Pomelo have physical stores apart from their big online presence? How much is offline and how much is online?
  • [25:55] Pomelo started 100% online but as an online e-commerce provider, what was the main driver for the company to set up a retail store?
  • [31:30] Pomelo's retail store also serves as a showroom for the goods and products. Is there a typical customer journey wherein one comes into the store, tries a product, goes home, checks it on their website and buys it?
  • [34:40] Compared to a traditional retailer, Pomelo can make more iterations at a much faster rate. When the company tries to improve their app or their stores, what's the starting point? How does that happen?
  • [37:05] David and Graham touch on the challenge of creating a culture where people can share ideas
  • [39:15] "What your strength is could be your potential downfall". How does David get himself out of that comfort zone?
  • [43:00] "Be honest and vulnerable. When people give you feedback, do not overreact and don't defend your ideas - listen."
  • [45:15] "Apple is a tech company but effectively is a retail company. There is real value in being able to go and walk the shop floor." Can you be a pure playing e-commerce buyer in fashion and succeed without that front-end?
  • [47:30] As Pomelo had a physical store, did it change how David's and his team thought who they were or how they thought about their roles?