315: Jes Kaliebe Petersen – Overview of The Myanmar startup ecosystem (Asia Matters)

Podcast highlights:

  • 05:20 Phandeeyar – the Myanmar Innovation Lab – is interested in using technology to accelerate impact in Myanmar. The Accelerator programme has been running since 2016. Every year, a new cohort of 7 to 10 startups is onboarded. Workshops are held on tech and startups, alongside a co-working space and social impact programmes for people like civic techies and activists.
  • 08:59 Chate Sat – a platform for freelancers – is one of the startup successes of Phandeeyar. It was founded by two sisters, who joined the accelerator in 2016.
  • 18:10 Jes Kaliebe Petersen talks about his journey; starting off in Microsoft and how he found himself in Myanmar today. He first became a developer in e-commerce, and then co-founded a business in India. He then moved back to Denmark, to a Fintech company. In 2010, he left for Kabul, Afghanistan, to develop an SMS based social network.
  • 34:55 The sense of community in Myanmar: The phenomenon of people rallying together around common causes, even those that they may not be directly involved with. People are approachable and easy to work with.

299: Future of work, up-skilling and top 3 learnings to run impactful conferences and learning events – with Casey Lau – Co-Host, RISE ASIA (NSH3)

Podcast highlights:

  • 00:53 Let’s start with Casey’s In the making’, the man behind the growth of RISE Asia in the past 4 years as it’s co-host and how he met and agree to join Paddy Cosgrave, the Founder of RISE, who also founded Web Summit for Europe and Collision for US – the brain behind this vision of disrupting tech conferences for scale and impact.
  • 04:54 On disrupting conference/learning and development formats for the sake of the audience. Are you re thinking of how you design them?

    People are looking for engaging content. It’s no longer that you can throw someone on the stage and expect someone to listen to them. You have to have a whole experience. It’s like going to Disneyland. That’s what Paddy has created with the conferences. It is like Disneyland – you see the big attractions, but you also try out the crazy hot dog, the mickey waffles, take a roller coaster ride. Some times you don’t know where you end up, whom you meet. It is very spontaneous.

    A great example of “ENGINEERING SYNCHRONICITY” – using data science, using technology to run a conference/learning events).

  • 09:35 Starting up vs. Startups? Starting up in a big Corporate or a tech company is a huge trend too. #Futureofwork
  • 11:30 Conferences are a great way to stay competitive, upskill oneself – be it as a speaker or as an attendee or as an organiser. Let’s talk about the 3 major takeaways and learnings:

    1. ***How to put together a conference

    2. ***Speaking at Conference – How to pitch to sign up as a speaker and speak more effectively at public conferences/ public events

    3. ***How to network more effectively

  • 21: 58 Pitfalls or failures or Lessons to be shared. Any example?
  • 28:23 Future of work. Role of network, the community outside of your own company, own startup? How would work differently tomorrow and the ways to keep up skilling yourself
  • 31:00 Biggest asset of an accelerator is it’s network. The mentor network
  • 03:39 Why RISE is different and unique?

    1. We are able to bring an amazing speaker team from around the world to Asia/ HK. Like – founder of Tinder, founder of Didi coming this year (July 2018). We are able to mix lot of the European, American and Asian leaders together on stage and not easy to inter mingle otherwise.

    2. It doesn’t end at 5 pm. It takes a breather and continues through the night – for what we call the NIGHT SUMMIT. So one can continue sharing what you’ve learnt during the day, meet investors, media, all kinds of tech people…

    Rise turns the entire city in a startup hub for 3 days.

  • RISE 2018 (4th year) is happening on July 9-12.

298: Jianggan Li on Momentum Works, Tech Accelerators, and Opportunities in China

Podcast highlights:

  • 04:33 You describe Momentum Works as a tech accelerator. What do you do? — Over the past two years we’ve changed our business model quite a bit. For many ventures, you can get a team together, get some investors, and start producing a product. The problems come next when you have to deal with customers, have to find the right people to help you expand, etc. At Momentum Works, we hunt startups. To be a successful accelerator, you can either be really knowledgeable about niche markets and products, or you act more like a pure VC where you basically just supply money. We do a bit of both.
  • 32:55 Do you spend a lot of time traveling to and from China? — In 2018 have traveled there at least once every six weeks, usually to either Beijing or Hangzhou. We have to otherwise you end up losing touch with the market. What’s interesting is the degree to which there is a lot of second-generation wealth in China looking for places to invest. It’s very common that once people get rich in China they begin to look for off-shore opportunities for their assets. Singapore is becoming more and more attractive in this regard.
  • 41:30 As you continue to develop Momentum Works, what kinds of startups are you looking to have walk through your door? — We are always open to talking to people. The people we like to work with are those who are passionate, but who also understand what’s going on in the world. How is what they are doing similar to what others are doing in different markets? Having this sort of strategic openness to what’s going on, to the bigger picture, really helps. It’s really hard to tolerate people who lack logic in what they’re doing. People are good at telling stories, but it takes logic to turn plans into reality.

Podcast notes:

  • 00:05 Welcome Jianggan Li, founder and CEO of Momentum Works, to ATP Stories with host Graham Brown.
  • 00:27 You describe yourself as an entrepreneur across emerging markets. Can you describe what this means? — We are living in a world where there is lots of growth in different markets. Interested in the dynamics of each market and how to break into each market, work with locals, and make something happen. Have worked in six markets across Southeast Asia and speak seven languages, if only basic conversations in some of them.
  • 04:33 You describe Momentum Works as a tech accelerator. What do you do? — Over the past two years we’ve changed our business model quite a bit. For many ventures, you can get a team together, get some investors, and start producing a product. The problems come next when you have to deal with customers, have to find the right people to help you expand, etc. At Momentum Works, we hunt startups. To be a successful accelerator, you can either be really knowledgeable about niche markets and products, or you act more like a pure VC where you basically just supply money. We do a bit of both.
  • 10:30 You’ve lived in many places, but you’ve gravitated towards Singapore as a base for your latest project. Why does it make sense to have an accelerator in Singapore? — Over the course of 13 years, have been coming to Singapore. It’s in the middle of everything. There’s money, there’s a great network, etc. It’s a good place to have your tech lead or your talent lead.
  • 13:40 You helped set up Easy Taxi in Singapore. Tell us what that was like. — Originally the Easy Taxi work was part of Rocket Internet. While living in France, met someone who knew about Easy Taxi and encouraged me to get into touch with them to see if they were interested in coming into the market in Singapore. The tech team was based in Brazil, which made the time difference quite complicated to work around.
  • 16:33 If a startup came to you now at Momentum Works and described having their various units spread around the globe, do alarm bells ring in your head? — Wouldn’t say alarm bells. If you’ve managed to build a team across different geographies, this in and of itself is quite a feet. We would be keen to see if it could be made to work.
  • 21:05 Tell us more about Momentum Works. How do you organize yourself? — People usually come to us, often through referrals. We thought about the idea of doing batches, but we didn’t go in this direction. If someone comes to us, we will have lengthy discussions with them and see if it is something we can get involved with and to what extent we can contribute. For us it can take the form of joint-ventures where we’re involved in the day-to-day, or as simply providing cash.
  • 31:10 Are there any other players in the accelerator space trying to operate similar to the way you do things, as sort of a middle ground? — There are a few here in Singapore who do that. There are also some alumni from Rocket Internet in various places trying to do things in different ways. It is interesting to see how people are trying to experiment with different accelerator models.
  • 32:55 Do you spend a lot of time traveling to and from China? — In 2018 have traveled there at least once every six weeks, usually to either Beijing or Hangzhou. We have to otherwise you end up losing touch with the market. What’s interesting is the degree to which there is a lot of second-generation wealth in China looking for places to invest. It’s very common that once people get rich in China they begin to look for off-shore opportunities for their assets. Singapore is becoming more and more attractive in this regard.
  • 37:10 With the rise of Chinese wealth, there is a massive shift of talent moving to Asia. Have you noticed a different type of entrepreneur on the ground now? — Certainly. In one regard, we see people working on projects where it’s simply easier for them to operate in a more relaxed privacy and regulatory environment. In time, when regulations in China catch up to those in the West, companies will have been able to learn a lot from the data they were able to collect and analyze.
  • 41:30 As you continue to develop Momentum Works, what kinds of startups are you looking to have walk through your door? — We are always open to talking to people. The people we like to work with are those who are passionate, but who also understand what’s going on in the world. How is what they are doing similar to what others are doing in different markets? Having this sort of strategic openness to what’s going on, to the bigger picture, really helps. It’s really hard to tolerate people who lack logic in what they’re doing. People are good at telling stories, but it takes logic to turn plans into reality.

280: What must you avoid to fall in the pit of failure? In the Making w/ William Bao Bean and Sebastien Gaudin (NSH2)

Podcast highlights:

  • 02:40 Let’s put this very interesting podcast conversation in the context: William runs an accelerator. Sebastien runs a startup which was part of the accelerator program and now in scale up phase, and me as the podcast host, as well as, accelerator mentor….
  • 10:07 What’s the difference between being a founder and entrepreneur? William Bao Bean , General Partner at SOSV, Managing Director at Chinaccelerator and MOX explains why founders have to be entrepreneurs. There can’t be one without the other. Most normal people don’t put all their eggs in one basket. They don’t quit their jobs, use up all their savings to try and do something that has not been done before. Entrepreneurs take risks to try change the world and make a significant difference. They are trying to change the way things are being done.
  • 11:33 Nishtha – “People often ask me if being an entrepreneur is in the DNA or can be learnt”. William: “We are part of a long term study. HPDI. Shows how you make decisions. How you make trade offs. People are pre disposed to being risk takers. Opposite of that is like a CTO. We don’t take too many risk mitigators in our start ups because working for a start up drives you nuts. We invest in people who are kind of crazy and we use the accelerator program to filter out the insane ones”
  • 13:53 In the Making podcast is a great opportunity to say thank you to many who contributed to your journey and success and how they shaped you. We don’t say enough thank you’s. This is a great moment to share with the listeners…
  • 23:05 What are the factors that contribute to a successful acceleration of a start up or acceleration of a new service/product?
    1. EXPERIMENTATION. The first factor is being open to coaching and experimentation. Other factors include persistence. There might be a lot of failures but still you have to keep smashing your head against the wall over and over again. We try very hard to not tell our companies what to do. But we make a lot of suggestions on what to try. And people who are willing to jump off the cliff and try a bunch of new things, even if in the heart of their hearts they think it might not work, nonetheless they try are often the ones who succeed.
    2. NOT GIVING UP. So it takes a certain type of personality to try lots and lots of different things over and over again that don’t work, becuase in the end you are trying to solve a problem that hasn’t been solved before or isnt being solved properly so you are trying to come up with a better solution.
    3. THE RIGHT TEAM. Team is what we look at. It’s not always about the product. The founder has to be passionate enough to make these first two factors work
  • 27:09 In the making of any new innovation- product or service is about failures too. Any examples?
    Sebastien: The fact that i picked up the set of team that i did at start, was a failure. It didn’t let us go through this iterations, adaptations and learn and develop fast enough. It took us 2 years to come to the DNA of where we are now. Ofcourse we learnt a lot in this period. But we lost time. Team was too young and not complimentary enough.
    William: My first startup was a pretty low point. I took my own money and couple of friends while i was still at Soft Bank. First mistake – doing a startup without being 100% focussed. Second mistake – the team combo. Third mistake – I was a bad CEO.
  • 33:10 Sebastien Gaudin , CEO & Co-founder at The CareVoice and William share three tips for start ups to totally avoid to fall in the pit of failure. Few –
    “Opinions are like noses. Everyone has them. Take opinions under advise-ment. You need to know when to apply and where and use that to drive your experiments. and make decisions based on data as opposed to somebody’s opinion”
    “No marketing expense until you have your product/service taking off. Product-Market fit. I burnt cash when i started off and you don’t need that at all. Start with your brand and your team”….

  • 34:48 – Show finale. Rapid fire round between the host and the guests.
    What other professional other than your current would you like to attempt?
    What are you not good at?
    How do you manage anger?
    How do you manage stress?
    What’s coming up next – In the Making for The Care Voice and Chinaccelerator
    What would you like to ask to the network of listeners and Asia Tech Podcast. Make the ask
    Working in a different country. Why should you consider working in a different country other than your home country?

    “Commit to the uncomfortable” – #NishHosts Show – IN THE MAKING

260: Michael Bloomberg On-board for the Asian Century? (Asia Matters)

Podcast highlights:

  • 02:42 Michael Bloomberg’s vision for an Asian Davos
  • 19:56 Asia Tech Podcast gets a new studio in Singapore
  • 31:05 Podcasting and the future of branding
  • 55:15 Asia Tech Podcast’s new internship opportunity

Podcast notes:

  • Note: This podcast contains explicit language
  • 00:05 ATP650 – Asia Matters with Graham Brown
  • 02:42 Michael R. Bloomberg, American businessman and philanthropist, wants to create a rival to the Davos-based World Economic Forum that will focus on Asia and the Asian Century. The inaugural session will take place this November, 2018 in Beijing. — This is certainly a way to acknowledge China’s lead in the global ecosystem.
  • 07:50 Data from the #AsiaMatters Report published this year bolsters the case for Bloomberg’s vision. Key takeaways include Asia is a US$27 trillion economy. This is 50% bigger than either the US or the EU. By 2030, the Asian middle classes are expected to grow to 3.2 billion people — an enormous market potential!
  • 12:09 The Asia Matters Report talks about four steps that will bring about the Asian Century. 1) The demographic advantage that allowed for low-cost manufacturing production. 2) Capital reinvestment that helped build the Asian middle class and a skills, talent, wealth, and innovation boom, which is now allowing for 3) an increasing innovation advantage (AI, autonomous vehicles, etc). Asia is taking the lead in innovation. Finally, 4) Asia will eventually become the global hegemon and the “default option” for business.
  • 17:12 The Asia Matters Institute was created as a forum to help foster these connection. The goal was helping experts outside Asia find their counterparts in the region, and also to help people in Asia better find and communicate. If you are a speacalist with something to offer, get in touch!
  • 19:56 Exciting news from Singapore as Asia Tech Podcast opens its own studio! Special thanks to the team at Platform E for making this possible!
  • 22:18 Platform E is a co-working space, incubator, accelerator, and community. Shout-out to Rina Neoh and Abdul Malik! They get things done!
  • 26:06 Thunder and lightening shenanigans!
  • 26:25 On networking. There are two types of people: energy-takers and net energy-givers. Find the energy-givers and work with them!
  • 31:05 Why podcasting is the future of personal branding. Conferences and traditional networking events almost never give you information beyond what’s available on someone’s website. Nothing “wow’s” us at those things. Podcasting, on the other hand, brings out the human element. That’s what people want!
  • 38:08 Revealing your vulnerability and humanizing yourself to others is one of the most effective ways to get ahead. Show that you have the confidence to take the arrows of criticism. Blaze the trail! Give people the Oprah moment! People want to know about you!
  • 43:10 The vision for Asia Tech Podcast is to create the platform for those human conversations…to give that voice to the Asian tech ecosystem. The new studio will really help to make live radio shows…to make real conversations!
  • 52:28 For all the talk about the digital world being the future, you can’t fake a real, human conversation. This is what makes podcasts. And this is what will make the Asian Century. There are countless stories waiting to be told! That’s what we’re going to do here on Asia Tech Podcast.
  • 55:15 If this sounds like your passion, apply to be our intern. Come be a part of the Asian Century!

249: Kineret Karin, Growing a Social Impact Accelerator

Podcast highlights:

  • 22:55 Kineret Karin’s thoughts on the growth of accelerator companies and the startup accelerator model in Singapore
  • 28:25 The challenge of identifying the right startups and Kineret’s strategy to overcome this
  • 34:12 The double bottom line – measuring the economics of na ImpacTech startup involves measuring the social impact created and the associated financial model associated

Podcast notes:

  • 00:05 Welcome Kineret Karin to Asia Tech Podcast Stories, hosted by Graham Brown
  • 01:11 Kineret talks about ImpacTech, a Singapore based accelerator focused on startups that create a positive impact on the environment and the society
  • 02:02 How ImpacTech has grown and evolved since Kineret’s last appearance on the show in August last year
  • 06:03 Are corporate accelerators the future? ImpacTech’s collaborations with large coorporations like Shell and Singtel
  • 08:23 Kineret shares the process behind ImpacTech’s work with Shell
  • 11:53 The first five start ups selected for the ImpacTech program with Shell – hydrogen batteries for electric scooters, smart meters for utilities, wireless charging for busses and cars, more cost effective solar panels, smart tent for the homeless and energy panels for different weathers
  • 14:42 The learning curve working with engineering startups – Kineret’s background is in the service industry
  • 17:25 Shell’s commitments to startups in this batch
  • 19:07 Why are large corporates like Shell investing resources into startups? What is in it for them?
  • 20:51 Are large corporates genuinely helping startups or just doing it for PR purposes? How can you tell?
  • 22:55 Kineret’s thoughts on the growth of accelerator companies and the startup accelerator model in Singapore
  • 27:18 Singtel and ImpacTech’s start up accelerator program “Future Makers” and what it involves
  • 28:25 The challenge of identifying the right startups and Kineret’s strategy to overcome this
  • 30:47 The commitments between startups and Singtel for startups in the 4 month “Future Makers” program
  • 32:30 Kineret’s secret methods of distinguishing a good startup from the rest
  • 34:12 The double bottom line – measuring the economics of na ImpacTech startup involves measuring the social impact created and the associated financial model associated
  • 35:14 How does Kineret measure the potential social impact of a startup?
  • 36:56 Kineret shares future plans for ImpacTech including expansions to Thailand, Hong Kong and Japan
  • 40:16 What kind of start ups is ImpacTech interested in?
  • 42:10 When would it be the best time for a start up to contact accelerator companies like ImpacTech?
  • 44:29 Get in touch with Kineret through her LinkedIn or website>

243: Julian Kwan – Investacrowd (Founders in Asia FIA3)

Podcast highlights:

  • 12:00 How did Julian Kwan get started in Singapore? It’s the best place to start a property tech business. Thinking where the investment comes from is critical
  • 24:25 The huge sense of belief and 150% conviction that you need to have in starting a business. The dilemma startups face with an idea that’s too early for the market (like real estate token exchanges)
  • 39:50 Asian companies don’t support startups like Western companies do. Raising money from traditional sources is much harder in Asia than in The West – but is this situation changing in recent years?

Podcast notes:

  • 00:05 Welcome Julian Kwan to Asia Tech Podcast Founders in Asia with Jodie Collins
  • 01:25 How did Julian Kwan get into Asia? A backstory on Julian backpacking in and around Asia, studying in Beijing, then working in Shanghai on different jobs before moving onto real estate development and renovating a prosthetics factory in Shanghai
  • 06:35 Did Julian have any local partner to work with in the renovation of the prosthetics factory project? Turning it to a hotel, raising money from a big American entrepreneur, opening it, eventually signing up a couple of deals with real estate developers in China then expanding into other parts of Asia
  • 08:50 Did Julian move to Sri Lanka permanently for a project there? The challenges Julian faced in doing business at Sri Lanka
  • 12:00 How did Julian Kwan get started in Singapore? It’s the best place to start a property tech business. Thinking where the investment comes from is critical
  • 15:05 What is Investacrowd? A real-estate financing company, a tech platform where global investors can access high-quality commercial real-estate investments – a diversification tool
  • 17:35 Did Julian develop the Investacrowd technology in Singapore? Expansion plans into adopting the blockchain technology and the shareholdings into the smart contracts instead of old paper contracts
  • 20:50 How did Julian develop the idea behind Investacrowd? What was his inspiration for starting the business and how did Julian transition from idea to making it happen?
  • 24:25 The huge sense of belief and 150% conviction that you need to have in starting a business. The dilemma startups face with an idea that’s too early for the market (like real estate token exchanges)
  • 28:20 Does Julian see ICTX (Investacrowd Token), an extension of the Investacrowd business, as a pivot away from what he is doing?
  • 30:25 As the CEO, how does Julian balance out his team in terms of where their focus is on the existing business versus the new business? And how are the “old-world” real estate companies moving into the blockchain space?
  • 35:55 Being a business founder now working in an area that is moving at an extremely fast pace, how does Julian manage that from a health and time perspective?
  • 39:50 Asian companies don’t support startups like Western companies do. Raising money from traditional sources is much harder in Asia than in The West – but is this situation changing in recent years?
  • 42:35 Where are the most interesting markets for property technology in Asia?
  • 44:30 Julian’s tips for founders who are looking to move or are interested in Asia – find and go what’s behind the curve; work in an accelerator or VC fund, see all the different things and come up with something of your own; understand the cost space; play the long game otherwise people won’t work with you

232: Shanghai Round Table with Kapil Kane, Jasper Gill, Vincent Djen, Carmen Wang and Nishtha Mehta (Asia Matters)

Podcast highlights:

  • 09:40 What makes Shanghai special? We listen to insights from Kapil Kane, Jasper Gill, Vincent Djen, Carmen Wang and Nishtha Mehta. We learn about the “Shanghai hump”? They say that if you live in Shanghai for four years, you’ll stay forever
  • 19:55 Shanghai is a maturing startup ecosystem so new accelerator models are emerging. We take a look into the world of XNode. XNode is a late stage accelerator, focused on scaling up startups. XNode mainly works with corporate like Intel
  • 41:05 What advice would our entrepreneurs give to people from The West who want to be part of the Shanghai scene? Empathy and tolerance go a long way. Volunteer and work for value exchange, come committed and for the long haul. Learn and localise fast, drop the ego. Stay hungry and foolish

Podcast notes:

  • 00:05 ATP620 – Asia Matters with Graham Brown
  • 00:35 Introducing XNode Shanghai – a physical coworking space in the startup accelerator with Jasper Gill who moved to Shanghai from Vancouver 2 1/2 years ago
  • 02:20 Vincent Djen from Hong Kong, cofounder of FashionEx which helps fashion startups to learn to grow and scale their business in the massive fashion scene in Shanghai
  • 04:15 Carmen Wnag from Nanjing – studying in US, Spain, Italy, India. We learn it’s typical of her generation to go out to the world and absorb different cultures
  • 06:50 What is it about China that you see a lot of female entrepreneurs? 50% of coders at Le Wagon Shanghai are females – ahead of Marseille, Lisbon, Barcelona. Females now are free to do what they want to do and choose to work or start their own company
  • 09:40 What makes Shanghai special? We listen to insights from Kapil Kane, Jasper Gill, Vincent Djen, Carmen Wang and Nishtha Mehta. We learn about the “Shanghai hump”? They say that if you live in Shanghai for four years, you’ll stay forever
  • 12:30 We listen to the story of Vincent Djen and FashionEx. Does the world need a fashion tech accelerator? Vincent shares the stories of how fashion brands are using AI to help find customers. We also hear an interesting case study about 3D printing customised bras for women
  • 15:35 What brought Carmen back to Shanghai after traveling around the world? We hear Carmen’s story of working on augmented reality software for a US company
  • 17:00 Where did Jasper’s scaleup accelerator idea come from? A backstory on Jasper’s earlier work in Shanghai and a further insight into how things move at a pace here
  • 19:55 Shanghai is a maturing startup ecosystem so new accelerator models are emerging. We take a look into the world of XNode. XNode is a late stage accelerator, focused on scaling up startups. XNode mainly works with corporate like Intel
  • 23:01 Why did Vincent choose XNode as his startup’s partner and what keeps him in Shanghai after 12 years of living there? We learn about the opportunities in Shanghai and how in areas such as fashion, it’s emerging to be one of the major metropolitan cities of the world
  • 25:20 What do they wish to change in Shanghai? Jasper is bugged about people not moving to the right-hand side of the escalator while Carmen complains about the price of housing!
  • 28:25 Everything just happens fluidly in Shanghai where it’s so open and easy to talk to people – Jasper’s first week in Shanghai and Carmen’s idea with a mixed-reality dining experience
  • 33:30 Is Shanghai indicative of the rest of China? We learn about the talent and people in Shanghai and how that sets its vibe apart from the rest of China
  • 34:40 35% of its population of Vancouver is of Chinese origin. Did this make it easier for Jasper (who is from Vancouver) to integrate with Shanghai?
  • 37:45 How important is that “international element” in Shanghai?
  • 38:40 Introducing Nishtha Mehta, lean innovation coach. We also talk about making the move from India to China.
  • 41:05 What advice would our entrepreneurs give to people from The West who want to be part of the Shanghai scene? Empathy and tolerance go a long way. Volunteer and work for value exchange, come committed and for the long haul. Learn and localise fast, drop the ego. Stay hungry and foolish

230: Jon Tanner – Talent Trends and the Future of Work in Asia

Podcast highlights:

  • 06:45 The Asian talent Market is “equalising” says Jon Tanner. What does this mean?
  • 29:20 Are coworking spaces the future model of work? We look at the latest trends. Still an ongoing social experiment but it certainly benefits the movement of talent in Asia
  • 40:50 Talented employees want to build something, solve a problem, make a mark in some way – we refer to the case study of Chirayu Wadke from SeedPlus ex Google Silicon Valley talking about working on 10x projects

Podcast notes:

  • 00:05 Welcome Jon Tanner to Asia Tech Podcast Stories
  • 00:45 What are the big changes in the Asian talent market?
  • 03:10 What are the reasons why people are coming to Asia now? San Francisco, New York and London are potentially both pricing themselves out of the market and offering less opportunity for the most talented of employees.
  • 05:25 Bali Green School in Bali and Bali House in Canggu – mix, co-working, incubator, hospitality space. People are making some serious choices about their lives and careers today beyond their benefits package
  • 06:45 The Asian talent Market is “equalising” says Jon Tanner. What does this mean?
  • 10:25 Talented employees aren’t focused on taking the highest-paying job in San Francisco anymore. A new generation of talent is seeking out something riskier, that makes Asia an interesting option
  • 12:20 Silicon Valley leads with regard to stories about role models which inevitably attracts people to the West Coast but the gap with Asia is closing fast. Asia is slowly discovering its own role models
  • 16:05 Could Jon see the situation where he could run Mitchell Lake from Bali and send his kids to Green School? We talk about the backstory of Steve Monroe coming into Ubud to found co-working space Hubud. Career paths are changing
  • 19:30 Do large IT companies need to rethink how they work with talent? Are they sending departments out into coworking spaces such as Hubud for the right reasons?
  • 24:00 Would this kind of remote work for a bank? What would the benefits of HSBC setting up in a coworking space be?
  • 27:20 Why did Jon suggest to his clients the idea of coming across and working in the same coworking space? What’s it actually like sharing a coworking space with clients?
  • 29:20 Are coworking spaces the future model of work? Still an ongoing social experiment but it certainly benefits the movement of talent in Asia
  • 33:30 Which IT companies does Jon admire with regards to digital transformation? We look at who is leading the way in decentralizing the workspace
  • 36:25 The success or failure of digital transformation comes down to its mechanics: The backstory of Innovation Director of Intel China – Kapil Kane – and his battle in getting Intel to agree to build the accelerator outside their office. We also look at the Virgin group example
  • 40:50 Talented employees want to build something, solve a problem, make a mark in some way – we refer to the case study of Chirayu Wadke from SeedPlus ex Google Silicon Valley talking about working on 10x projects
  • 42:30 The sharing economy combined with changing attitudes towards the “stuff” of life means talented people who have choices aren’t necessarily motivated by the things which our parents sought out like cars, job titles etc.
  • 44:55 Jon’s thoughts on frontier markets such as Vietnam, Indonesia and Thailand
  • 47:05 Does Jon see a lot of interest in recruitment coming from that Asia-to-Asia market?
  • 49:40 Thoughts on Asia as frontrunning global trends in the curation of workplace culture and talent
  • 54:00 Check out Jon Tanner at www.mitchellake.com
  • 218: Simon Kim – FASTx and The Startup Ecosystem in Tokyo

    Podcast highlights:

    • 24:44 The population fundamentals of Japan and how demographic changes shape the startup ecosystem
    • 36:29 Start up founders in Tokyo tend to get bank loans by default instead of seeking angel investors – does this present a challenge to Japan?
    • 40:48 The city of Fukuoka and its top down approach to building an ecosystem. Is it sustainable long term?

    Podcast notes:

    • 00:05 Welcome Simon Kim to Asia Tech Podcast Stories, hosted by Graham Brown
    • 01:00 A little bit about Simon Kim’s background and how he arrived in Japan
    • 02:00 All about FASTx, a start up accelerator platform and coworking space
    • 06:00 Bringing a Western influence into Japan
    • 07:20 Was not speaking Japanese when coming to Japan an issue for Simon?
    • 10:40 The reasons Simon chose Japan as a place to base FASTx, a start up accelerator
    • 14:55 Risk adversity in Japan. Why be a start up founder when you can work for Mitsubishi?
    • 15:55 The distinct lack of success stories about Japanese entrepreneurs
    • 18:45 The history of Japan often changes from the outside. Is that what Simon is trying to do?
    • 21:50 How is the typical start up founder in the Japan different compared to founders from other countries?
    • 24:44 The population fundamentals of Japan and how demographic changes shape the startup ecosystem
    • 27:40 Simon’s experiences of mentoring young start up founders in Japan
    • 28:56 The Japanese idea of starting a side business to supplement income
    • 31:48 The Japanese buoyance and passion about making things, and how this is reflected in start ups
    • 34:40 Business failure in Japan and facing debts when a start up fails
    • 36:29 Start up founders in Tokyo tend to get bank loans by default instead of seeking angel investors – does this present a challenge to Japan?
    • 40:48 The city of Fukuoka and its top down approach to building an ecosystem. Is it sustainable long term?
    • 44:25 Can the alternative lifestyle of Fukuoka be extended to Tokyo and other cities?
    • 49:50 Would Simon consider working with someone who is doing their start up on a part time basis? Does age matter?
    • 53:37 Founders need to have a good ability to present and sell their product
    • 55:26 Go to fastx.jp to out more about FASTx and sign up for the upcoming competition in April.To get in touch with Simon, email [email protected]