313: Edith Yeung on investment and future of blockchain (Ashley Talks 21)

Podcast highlights:

  • 14:58 You are investing a lot in China while many of your colleagues in the San Francisco area do not. How does this usually work? — Each investor has a different style in terms how they want to attract companies. It tends to be easier if you’re vertically focused on a particular market, for example blockchain. If you are a founder, it’s necessary to find the people who are vertically focused on the products or markets you are interested in. You should know when you reach out who you want to be contacting regarding potential investments.
  • 24:24 Turning now to the topic of blockchain, what is your vision of the future of blockchain? — Multiple parts to this answer. Excited because it represents a change in how we think about the ownership of data. From a technology side, it’s changed how people think about a lot of relationships. Obviously distributed ledger technology is not new, but what is new is the idea of tokenization. It helps creators and investors get the capital and resources they need right from the start. China and the Chinese government have been very supportive of blockchain as a technology. What they haven’t been supportive of is all the cryptocurrency exchanges and initial coin offerings (ICOs). China is just a huge market that basically any company focused on establishing themselves there will have enough to attract investment.
  • 44:25 Let’s talk about women for a bit. How did it feel to be a female developer working in this space? — First of all, we should encourage everyone, not just women to have a basic understanding of coding. This is going to be a building block for so many things in the future. Even if you don’t end up being the person writing the code, you will be able to have meaningful conversations with people who do. In China, have met so many great women CEOs and investors. The important thing is to know what you’re talking about. It’s not about being a woman, it’s about being good at what you do.

Podcast notes:

  • NOTE: This podcast contains explicit language
  • 00:05 Welcome Edith Yeung, Partner at 500 Startups, to Ashley Talks with host Ashley Galina Dudarenok.
  • 00:40 Tell us about your journey. How have you ended up in San Francisco Bay investing in so many global startups? — Born and raised in Hong Kong. Came to the US at age 16 as an exchange student. Stayed with an American family in the Midwest. Have been in the US for over 20 years and started career as a developer building risk-management systems. Started own entrepreneur group in San Francisco using Meetup, which turned into a sort of media conference business. Through this met a partner from mainland China who developed Dolphin Browser on Android. This experience led to wanting to do more with investments and startups, and so here we are.
  • 07:14 What are the biggest differences between managing an investment fund versus just investing by yourself? — As an angel investor, the thinking was why not invest some of your own money to help a company get off the ground. When managing a fund, however, the entire thought process is how do we maximize the return for our investors. As a fund manager, it’s necessary to have true conviction your decisions will make a return.
  • 14:58 You are investing a lot in China while many of your colleagues in the San Francisco area do not. How does this usually work? — Each investor has a different style in terms how they want to attract companies. It tends to be easier if you’re vertically focused on a particular market, for example blockchain. If you are a founder, it’s necessary to find the people who are vertically focused on the products or markets you are interested in. You should know when you reach out who you want to be contacting regarding potential investments.
  • 18:38 What are the companies you’ve invested in that you’ve liked the most or been most impressed with? Have you had any failures? — So many. Really, there have been so many. Very much enjoyed meeting Prerna Gupta who is founder and CEO at HOOKED, which is the number one reading app in the US for millennials. As an early-stage investor, it’s important to be open-minded about products and services people haven’t seen before. You can’t try to invest in the next Instagram, this just won’t work. As a fund manager, if you see a great investment and miss out, that is a failure. When you see something you believe in, you just have to go for it.
  • 24:24 Turning now to the topic of blockchain, what is your vision of the future of blockchain? — Multiple parts to this answer. Excited because it represents a change in how we think about the ownership of data. From a technology side, it’s changed how people think about a lot of relationships. Obviously distributed ledger technology is not new, but what is new is the idea of tokenization. It helps creators and investors get the capital and resources they need right from the start. China and the Chinese government have been very supportive of blockchain as a technology. What they haven’t been supportive of is all the cryptocurrency exchanges and initial coin offerings (ICOs). China is just a huge market that basically any company focused on establishing themselves there will have enough to attract investment.
  • 34:19 Do you have a favorite startup coming out of China now? — Again there are so many. If you think about content production companies, right now the power is in finding a way to produce and personalize content online. One exciting company in this space is Castbox. They are very impressive. Another company is Agora. They are doing basically video chat as a service. This is more back end, but it is gaining in popularity.
  • 44:25 Let’s talk about women for a bit. How did it feel to be a female developer working in this space? — First of all, we should encourage everyone, not just women to have a basic understanding of coding. This is going to be a building block for so many things in the future. Even if you don’t end up being the person writing the code, you will be able to have meaningful conversations with people who do. In China, have met so many great women CEOs and investors. The important thing is to know what you’re talking about. It’s not about being a woman, it’s about being good at what you do.
  • 50:52 Moving forward will you continue focusing on China? Will you continue focusing on any specific technologies? — Focusing on early-stage blockchain-related projects. This will be the focus for the next three to six months. If you’re working in this space, get in touch. It’s doesn’t matter if you’re focused on China or not. The number one quality to seek in a founder is to never take “no” for an answer.

259: Nabomita Mazumdar (Ashley Talks ASH13)

Podcast highlights:

  • 09:36 Where do you find energy for your passions? — Everyone needs something that can keep them awake at 2:00am. At the end of the day these communities are people in flesh and bone. Serving them is a wonderful thing.
  • 14:48 Why do so many women have a complicated relationship to money in business? — This is ironic because so many women have experiences as homemakers. Some of the best business skills you could hope for emerge from this work; but for some reason, when women become product-makers or entrepreneurs they become “too feminine” about money and almost shy to talk about numbers.
  • 31:28 What is the future for workers who in a very short time may lose their jobs and livelihoods as a result of automation and technological change? — Bots and robots are inevitable. The sorts of “cookie-cutter” jobs that were designed in the first place for machines and not humans will go back to the machines. These human workers are not yet ready to take on more specialized tasks. We need to change this.

Podcast notes:

  • 00:05 ASH13 – Ashley Talks with Ashley Galina Dudarenok and Nabomita Mazumdar
  • 00:55 What is your story? — In her final year in college, Nabomita was introduced to an anonymous online community in India. She linked up with the founder and helped establish offline chapters in cities across India and around the world. After four years as a contributor, she joined the effort full-time. These rich interactions taught her product development and business acumen.
  • 06:23 What are you working on right now? — Nothing inspires me more than building a product. Right now I’m working with a human resources (HR) company called comply4HR, which is a human resources compliance company who’s entire content is written by people in authority in HR governance. This makes the site valuable because the content is highly validated and curated.
  • 09:36 Where do you find energy for your passions? — Everyone needs something that can keep them awake at 2:00am. At the end of the day these communities are people in flesh and bone. Serving them is a wonderful thing.
  • 11:08 How do men and women differ in business? — Notice that we haven’t been talking about numbers or features. We’ve been talking about people, about women. This is the difference. Women do not think in terms of numbers but in terms of people. Sometimes this harms women trying to launch products or brands where investors and VCs want returns and systematized growth plans. Women need to learn these skills in order to succeed.
  • 14:48 Why do so many women have a complicated relationship to money in business? — This is ironic because so many women have experiences has homemakers. Some of the best business skills you could hope for emerge from this work, but for some reason when women become product-makers or entrepreneurs they become “too feminine” about money and almost shy to talk about numbers.
  • 17:35 What can men learn from women? — Empathy! Women instinctively know what to do next. If men can learn to empathize more and women learn number-crunching skills we can all build a better world.
  • 18:50 How have you seen India change in the past 10 years? — India is right now in a “maker’s moment.” Almost everyone is building a product. Everybody is adding to the ecosystem. It’s a great moment in India right now.
  • 20:30 What are some cities in India that everyone around the world should know? Where are the major tech hubs in India now? — Bangalore, Delhi, Mumbai are the major metropolises everyone knows. But also Pune, where they are trying to build the best healthcare platform. India’s tier-2 cities are picking up but the major metro areas still rule the roost.
  • 23:33 Is it difficult to be a young Indian woman in business in India? — In India it is not easy to be a woman in business. There are some men who support women. Maybe the number isn’t great yet, but things are improving.
  • 26:00 Do successful women simply make their mark and demand the world change to meet them? — Absolutely! Be so lost in following your dream that everybody follows you! Let nothing break you down! We need to showcase successful women. We need so many role models that we cannot help but see an inspiring woman no matter where we look.
  • 28:08 What has it been like speaking at TEDx? — Because of my experience I have learned to see where industries are going and this has allowed me to talk now about the future of work. In my thinking and research on this topic I found in India there are three levels of talent. 1) The Maker’s Movement. These are the people who can’t wait to build the next best thing. 2) Those people who are stable and want to continue in their jobs so they can keep increasing their assets. 3) Finally, there is a group who know they will likely be churned out after the next performance review. This third group are the people who are expanding the gig-economy. The entire experience of TED has been an education.
  • 31:28 What is the future for workers who in a very short time may lose their jobs and livelihoods as a result of automation and technological change? — Bots and robots are inevitable. The sorts of “cookie-cutter” jobs that were designed in the first place for machines and not humans will go back to the machines. But these human workers are not yet ready to take on more specialized tasks. We need to change this.
  • 35:06 What are some examples of products you think are built, as you say, “for humans”? — Think about it this way. India as a country is too large. We do not need every person to leave the village and find work and services in the cities. We need to make the same quality services available in the village. We need to allow people to live where they want without having to give up on products and services found now only in major cities. This is the kind of pathway we need to build.
  • 36:57 Do you think we will find a future where people can opt-out of the workforce entirely? Can you see a future where people don’t have to work if they don’t want to? — What a dream! One of my mentors once said we need a society where people do not have to leave their homes and villages to cater to the world. This is how we need to redesign the workforce of the future. Allow people to cater to the world from their homes.
  • 39:29 Thinking about the future, what technologies are you most excited about right now? — Honestly AI and blockchain. They are the paths to the future, but they are not the future. We will likely find even more specialized versions of them. It like peeling an onion, there are always more layers. Expect to see more disruption in data-privacy and security.
  • 41:59 Do you think the world understands India’s full potential? — If you’ve ever traveled in India, you will know India changes every 60 kilometers. There is huge potential in the market because almost every area has it’s own unique requirements.
  • 44:27 Do you see more young people with a desire to innovate? Or are young people less interested in contributing to industry? — What I see are young people making things all the time. It’s true they often don’t know how to make a product work in the long run, but they are super passionate. I want to see young people building responsible products so that they’re not just doing “me too’s” and copies of other products. Be disruptive but learn how scaling-up works and see how people in the past have moved from idea to established brand.
  • 49:09 A totally unrelated question: how have Indian people become so spiritual? How is it you can find incredible spiritual depth in India? — No matter your religion you have easy access to the scriptures. This level of access to spiritual content goes a long way in fusing people with a sense of spirituality. Buddha says, “your work is to find your work and fall in love with it.” When AI takes away our jobs, our work will be to find our work and fall in love with it.

254: String Nguyen (Ashley Talks ASH12)

Podcast highlights:

  • 01:00 Starting out on Meerkat, how did String Nguyen build content and community around her video content and eventually get 20,000 followers on Linkedin?
  • 13:10 Growing your Linkedin followers to 20,000+ . There’s a 30,000 limit on Linkedin followers, how do you get around it? How do you win a Linkedin “top voice” award? It’s all about community and growth.
  • 44:30 Why did String delete SnapChat? What’s the problem with SnapChat for content creators? How does the ROI of SnapChat compare with Linkedin?

Podcast notes:

  • 00:00 ASH12 – Ashley Talks with Ashley Galina Dudarenok and String Nguyen
  • 01:00 Starting out on Meerkat, how did String Nguyen build content and community around her video content and eventually get 20,000 followers on Linkedin?
  • 05:00 How do videos convert compared to other platforms? Before you get to conversion, you should build brand awareness? Is it okay to publish informal personal content on Linkedin or does it have to be slick and professional?
  • 08:45 In video content creation, it’s tortoise vs the hare. Personal branding is a marathon not a sprint. It’s a full time job that you have to commit to for the long term
  • 13:10 Growing your Linkedin followers to 20,000+ . There’s a 30,000 limit on Linkedin followers, how do you get around it? How do you win a Linkedin “top voice” award? It’s all about community and growth.
  • 14:10 An insight about String’s entrepreneurship and her journey. Where did it come from?
  • 19:00 How do you become good at communication and ask great questions in videos and podcasts?
  • 21:00 String’s thoughts on Blockchain and ICOs, including who she follows on Twitter
  • 30:00 How do education systems shape our thinking processes and entrepreneurship long term?
  • 31:40 What are String’s thought on Asia, innovation and entrepreneurship?
  • 39:00 Why did String double down on video? What does it mean for SEO? What about sponsored video content?
  • 44:30 Why did String delete SnapChat? What’s the problem with SnapChat for content creators? How does the ROI of SnapChat compare with Linkedin?
  • 52:00 Live Streaming and the future of Video. Ashley and String discuss Live Streaming in Asia, its impact on social media, micro influencers and new retail.

250: Case Engelen, CEO of Titoma (Ashley Talks ASH11)

Podcast highlights:

  • 07:25 Is Taiwan losing its competitive advantage against Mainland China? Is Case moving there from Taiwan?
  • 40:25 In terms of the manufacturing process itself, what is the technology that gives Case chills and excitement right now?
  • 44:05 More manufacturing migrating away from Mainland China into Southeast Asia and the rest of the world like Africa – what does Case think about that?

Podcast notes:

  • 00:05 ASH11 – Ashley Talks with Ashley Galina Dudarenok
  • 00:10 Welcome Case Engelen, CEO of Titoma, to Ashley Talks
  • 00:35 Case shares his journey into Taiwan and Mainland China and founding Titoma – “time to market”
  • 02:15 What is the difference between manufacturing in Taiwan and manufacturing in Mainland China?
  • 07:25 Is Taiwan losing its competitive advantage against Mainland China? Is Case moving there from Taiwan?
  • 11:10 Is Taiwan worse paid than Mainland China in the manufacturing world? Also, what are the pitfalls or dangers that manufacturing firms face now?
  • 20:30 What are the differences between hardware, software, and firmware? And how fast can people manufacture devices in places like Shenzhen?
  • 28:35 Does Case see a lot of factories, like traditional OEMs, start to market their own brands? Huawei as an example
  • 32:00 A lot of people think China is still a nation of copycats and that any partner you work with is potentially gonna stab you in the back, take the product and sell it by him/herself – what is Case’s take on that?
  • 38:20 Would Case encourage people to go to platforms like Kickstarter with an idea in order to raise money in order to test the market and move ahead with it?
  • 40:25 In terms of the manufacturing process itself, what is the technology that gives Case chills and excitement right now?
  • 44:05 More manufacturing migrating away from Mainland China into Southeast Asia and the rest of the world like Africa – what does Case think about that?
  • 50:45 What scares Case the most about China are the regulations which are often rather “fluid” but Ashley sees the situation getting a lot better
  • 55:55 What book or movie does Case recommend that gave him critical insight into China, the world or manufacturing?
  • 56:50 What does Case’s company, Titoma, do? Get in touch at titoma.com

245: Dan Waldschmidt – Edgy Conversations (Ashley Talks ASH10)

Podcast highlights:

  • 13:55 The four behaviours of high achievers – 1) use extreme behavior, 2) disciplined activity, 3) giving more value than you take and 4) being human
  • 35:25 How do you know you’re doing the right thing? – Staying grounded to core principles and “be, do, have” as a template for successful people. Also, what are you willing to do to get to where you want to be? Examples of Dan’s friends moving to the natural gas-rich North Dakota and of another friend who postponed her wedding for one extra year
  • 51:50 “You don’t have to be reckless but you don’t have to play it safe” – if you have this feeling that you’re meant for more but don’t know how to tap into that, lean into that feeling and raise your hand so we can guide you

Podcast notes:

  • 00:05 ASH10 – Ashley Talks with Ashley Galina Dudarenok
  • 00:10 Welcome Dan Waldschmidt of Edgy Conversations – international best-selling author, business strategist, speaker and extreme athlete to Ashley Talks
  • 01:00 What is the story of Dan? How did he arrive in Asia? The unfair advantage of being raised by strict parents who forced him to learn and be disciplined, reading 3,000 books and learning early on that he was good at growing businesses
  • 06:20 You have to love to learn with so much information out there – people make the mistake of getting locked in, “I already know, I don’t want your advice”, which holds them back from learning. But if you learn, there’s so much greatness for you and no limit to your capability
  • 08:40 Business leaders don’t set aside time to be quiet – take a step back and quietly look at what’s really going on and also the unfortunate state of the human mind programmed to link several things together that should never be linked together – especially when you’re having a bad day
  • 11:30 Dan Figuring out that he was so good at turning around businesses and making money early on – is it a skill? Can you learn it? Have you always had it? Is it your personality?
  • 13:55 Four behaviours of high achievers – 1) use extreme behavior, 2) disciplined activity, 3) giving more value than you take and 4) being human
  • 16:45 Giving Value – how do you put out a strategy about giving first but still staying profitable and growing? The example of a major software manufacturer in Silicon Valley giving value that eventually led to $300M in new revenue and how to create the Theater of Success to give value
  • 22:15 Being human – we’re great at a lot of stuff, we’re not robots, we make mistakes – but successful people hack that by using their flaws in humanity to help people achieve a high level of success – disrupting the “stiffness” of emails, resumes, by using curse words for people to get the sense that you meant it
  • 26:10 Who influenced Dan? How has he become so positive and is he always like that? Having that belief that his life was destined for greatness because he was unwilling to quit. Also, Dan using ultra-running as a way to stay in his mind, to be positive and realistic, and continue
  • 30:30 How did Dan start his blog? How impactful was it for his business and why does he keep going? Shifting his blogging from whatever he wanted to blog about into focusing on just one subject for a whole month to force himself to be disciplined and telling the story of Hollywood action star Sylvester Stallone in their blog
  • 35:25 How do people know they’re doing the right thing? – Staying grounded to core principles and “be, do, have” as template for successful people. Also, what are you willing to do to get to where you want to be? Examples of Dan’s friends moving to the natural gas-rich North Dakota and of another friend who postponed her wedding for one extra year
  • 42:35 Why are there so few businessmen who are willing to go through those lengths? Because they don’t need to. But you can create this need for change by having bigger goals than you’re achieving right now or find yourself in a situation where you’re forced to change
  • 44:15 Working across so many countries and continents, does Dan see that people perceive business success, the way these people approach doing business, and taking things to the next level differently? Culturally, we all think of success differently, but we’re all looking for this feeling of significance. That is universal
  • 47:25 What are the companies that Dan is running right now? Who does he work with and what does he do? Concentrating his work now on people who wanna change the world and make it better. Check out danwaldschmidt.com
  • 49:05 Is Dan focusing on the United States or global? Does he have any new markets like China and is coming there soon?
  • 51:50 “You don’t have to be reckless but you don’t have to play it safe” – if you have this feeling that you’re meant for more but don’t know how to tap into that, lean into that feeling and raise your hand so we can guide you
  • 53:15 You can get Dan’s book at freeedgybook.com for free, Dan tracks 1,300 resources through feedly.com to keep going after inspiration and motivation
  • 55:05 Jump in and allow yourself to dream that there’s more out there for you. It’s waiting for you to go and get it and all you haveto do is reach your hand out and take it

239: Fredrik Haren (Ashley Talks ASH9)

Podcast highlights:

  • 12:50 “Humanity to the power of ideas” – Fredrik’s inner theme which means believing in the potential of humanity and the power of ideas. If every human being reached their maximum potential and learn to share it, the world will be a better place
  • 24:45 What was the thing Fredrik learned that was really eye-opening or changed everything for him? Open up your brain to all ideas of doing something out there and select the best way instead of basing it on what you think historically, where you were born or what your passport is
  • 42:30 “A minute to learn, a lifetime to master”. How can one be good at professional speaking? The ones who make it speak from the heart and to be able to speak from your heart, you need to know your “inner theme”

Podcast notes:

  • 00:05 ASH9 with Fredrik Haren – Ashley Talks with Ashley Galina Dudarenok
  • 00:10 Welcome Fredrik Haren, author and professional speaker, to Ashley Talks
  • 01:00 How did it all happen for Fredrik? Publishing his first book and starting an internet company in 1995, selling it in 1999 before the dot-com bust, deciding to write and speak about creativity since 2000, moving to Beijing in 2005, before settling in Singapore in 2008, the most global place on Earth
  • 09:40 What are the most important or in-demand topics that people want Fredrik to talk about? The aspects of creativity and learning about the differences in creativity between developed and developing countries
  • 12:50 “Humanity to the power of ideas” – Fredrik’s inner theme which means believing in the potential of humanity and the power of ideas. If every human being reached their maximum potential and learn to share it, the world will be a better place
  • 15:40 With the rise of AI, how does Fredrik see creativity as something that humanity still holds on to? Can these algorithms be more creative and do it better?
  • 19:05 The use of technology to widen our world and connect all of mankind, and its effect to come 20 years from now
  • 23:05 How can people go from a nationalistic to a global mentality and enjoy the huge advantage now of people like the digital nomads who understood the digital change 15, 20 years ago? Travel the world, connect with more people. read news from many different countries
  • 24:45 What was the thing Fredrik learned that was really eye-opening or changed everything for him? Open up your brain to all ideas of doing something out there and select the best way instead of basing it on what you think historically, where you were born or what your passport is
  • 30:45 The whole idea of growing is to widen your horizons, the human dream of wanting to have a good life for me, my family, the society and the world, and his living on an island leading to him becoming very aware that everything is connected
  • 37:45 How does one start in the professional speaking industry? Who can become a professional speaker and who needs one? The professional speaking industry in Asia is in its infancy but it will be the biggest in 20 years
  • 42:30 “A minute to learn, a lifetime to master”. How can one be good at professional speaking? The ones who make it speak from the heart and to be able to speak from your heart, you need to know your “inner theme”
  • 47:35 What would be Fredrik’s advice to startup speakers? You need to find your own speaking essence by thinking about the 3 things people say to you after they hear you speak. Also, check out Fredrik’s new book “Spread Your Message. See the world. How to Become a Global Keynote Speaker”
  • 51:30 Find out more about Fredrik Haren at interesting.org, professionalspeaking.com and innertheme.com

231: Virginia Tan co-founder of Lean in China (Ashley Talks ASH8)

Podcast highlights:

  • 06:00 Why are there so many successful female entrepreneurs in China? China is one of the best places in the world for a woman to start her own business – we look at the reasons why
  • 13:50 In China, a lot more women are participating in technology than in The West- why is that? We look at Chinese pragmatism and their tendency to be early adopters of technology
  • 23:40 How can men support women in the workplace? This is never an easy subject as many men get scared off by gender politics. The participation of men as the game-changer in promoting gender equality

Podcast notes:

  • 00:05 ASH8 – Ashley Talks with Ashley Galina Dudarenok
  • 00:10 Today with Virginia Tan: co-founder of Lean in China, She Loves Tech, Teja Ventures
  • 01:00 How did Virginia’s journey with Lean in China, the first international Lean In circle outside of the US, start? A backstory on Virginia about growing up in Singapore, spending early parts of her career in Europe and the Middle East before quitting her job as a lawyer to the shock and disapproval of parents, moving to Beijing in 2013, meeting girls in a bar then Lean In China
  • 03:35 What was the most influential and empowering factor in Lean In – the book by Sheryl Sandberg – that motivated Virginia to start the organisation? The trigger was in the book but it’s the women she met in China that inspired her to start Lean In group
  • 06:00 Why are there so many successful female entrepreneurs in China? China is one of the best places in the world for a woman to start her own business – we look at the reasons why
  • 09:10 Do Chinese female entrepreneurs think differently? The combination of work ethic and the appetite for risk caused by the general environment benefits women (although it applies to the Chinese generally)
  • 12:20 Working 9-9-6 (9am to 9pm, 6 days a week) in China – the legacy of the hard work ethic. If you are going to start a business you need to think big
  • 13:50 In China, a lot more women are participating in technology than in The West- why is that? We look at Chinese pragmatism and their tendency to be early adopters of technology
  • 17:05 Are women also active in finance? Foreign-owned companies in China say the percentage of senior female leadership in China is much higher than in other countries
  • 18:25 The different relationship of Chinese women with money – China as an extremely pragmatic market and its women embracing that financial independence and economic empowerment
  • 20:25 Is the future female? Will the rest of the world catch up and will there be more women returning to work and starting their business and going into tech and finance?
  • 23:40 How can men support women in the workplace? This is never an easy subject as many men get scared off by gender politics. The participation of men as the game-changer in promoting gender equality
  • 28:40 What advice would Virginia give to women who are looking for mentors? Virginia never looked for mentors but was fortunate enough that her clients, bosses and even friends were her greatest mentors
  • 31:05 Who are the most important people in Virginia’s life that push her to improve and get better? Her guy friends focus on her professional development while girl friends focus on her personal development
  • 34:40 Success is relative but for Virginia, success is being able to pursue your dreams, having the freedom and autonomy to give your dreams a shot
  • 36:30 How can you achieve your life goals? Know what your dreams are – a long and tiring search, the things you can live with and can’t live without, then take that leap of faith and try despite the fear, but make sure you have a safety net
  • 39:35 What books would Virginia recommend to anyone out there to read about female entrepreneurship or the way that women can contribute to the workforce or personal development? How Google Works, Alibaba’s World to understand technology, Daring Greatly on emotional intelligence, Malcolm Gladwell books
  • 42:25 www.leaninchina.com.cn, one of China’s leading women’s non-profits, education and training and data research, 120 communities across China and more than 100,000 members. www.shelovestech.org, the world’s largest startup competition for women and technology entrepreneurs launching in May 8 and will be in 12 countries this year, including Hong Kong
  • 43:40 www.tejaventures.com – will be up soon but you can reach Virginia for queries at [email protected]
  • 45:00 Subscribe to ashleytalks.com

225: Asia’s $36 Trillion A2A Market (Asia Matters)

Podcast highlights:

  • 07:10 The A2A Metatrend – Asia to Asia trade. Asia now does more trade with itself than the rest of the world. The Asian Middle classes will be worth $36 trillion by 2030
  • 34:52 Why Asian brands have a massive advantage over Western competition. This is bad news for Amazon, especially in high growth markets such as Southeast Asia.
  • 73:20 The rising power of the middle class in Asia and how it is going to shape the future of key sectors like automotive

Podcast notes:

  • 00:05 ATP610 – Asia Matters with Graham D Brown on the biggest growth opportunity of the next 10 years
  • 01:05 The phenomenon of Bakugai or ‘explosive shopping’, a Japanese description of how Chinese tourists go shopping in Tokyo
  • 05:44 Going way back to when the Americans turned up in Europe
  • 07:10 The A2A Metatrend. Asia to Asia trade, projected to be a 36 trillion dollar market by 2030
  • 09:25 The construction of the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge and its potential implications
  • 16:36 The explosion of wealthy middle classed Asians over the next 10 years and its possible influence on world trade with Asia
  • 19:04 A comparison of Asia’s economy back in the 80s to what it is today, from Japan’s growth to China’s technological advancements
  • 27:43 An example of growth – bike-sharing startups are facing steep competition in Shanghai
  • 29:05 An overview of the A2A (Asia to Asia) market in terms of what it is today
  • 34:52 Why Asian brands have a massive advantage over Western competition
  • 44:25 Asian brands are using personal information data to optimise the retail experience as mentioned in the second AshleyTalks podcast
  • 46:42 There is access to large markets in Asia as a short flight from Singapore gives you access to half the world’s population
  • 48:25 There are smaller time zone differences within Asian countries compared to the West. Sounds trivial, but this has a big difference in ongoing communication
  • 49:24 Physical connectivity within the Greater Bay and Asia, from the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge to China’s One Belt One Road project
  • 53:30 The power of the Bamboo Network in Asia – interconnected Chinese families across Asia
  • 55:40 Western companies are going to find it a lot harder in Asia as their honeymoon period wears off
  • 58:58 Graham forecasts that in the next 5 to 10 years, Asian brands are going to take on Western competition on their home turf. We’re already seeing this with Alibaba.
  • 60:35 Rapid advancements in Artificial Intelligence (AI) in China and Asia
  • 63:55 Lessons from the automotive industry. If you look at automotive you see a recurring pattern in history – success isn’t based on disruptive innovation but from one country borrowing (or stealing) the ideas of another. Today in China it’s no different.
  • 67:05 The Lean Startup methodology in entrepreneurship and its history. Lean Startup owes a lot to a fusion of ideas from East and West
  • 73:20 The rising power of the middle class in Asia and how it is going to shape the future of key sectors like automotive

223: Owen Fitzpatrick – NLP for Storytelling, Branding and Leadership (Ashley Talks ASH7)

Podcast highlights:

  • 06:45 What’s NLP? Critics call it an evil cult, but Owen Fitzpatrick considers NLP a set of tools that can be used for both good and evil.
  • 18:00 Owen Fitzpatrick’s advice: Embrace what makes you different if you want to make a real impression.
  • 28:30 If you want people to do business with you, you need to be able to tell stories and to take clients on a journey.

Podcast notes:

  • 00:00 ASH7 – Ashley Talks with Ashley Galina Dudarenok and Owen Fitzpatrick
  • 00:05 Welcoming Owen Fitzpatrick to the show! Owen is a bestselling author and a globetrotting psychologist.
  • 02:00 So how exactly does one become a globetrotting psychologist and a bestselling author? Owen explains how he turned a personal need into a career.
  • 06:45 What’s NLP? Critics call it an evil cult, but Owen considers NLP a set of tools that can be used for both good and evil.
  • 11:30 According to Owen Fitzpatrick, anyone can learn neuro-linguistic processing. The only thing you need is an open mind.
  • 15:30 Owen and Ashley discuss the necessity of personal branding in today’s world. In addition to improving your products, you also need to improve yourself.
  • 18:00 Owen’s advice: Embrace what makes you different if you want to make a real impression.
  • 23:30 Have you ever heard of storynomics? Owen Fitzpatrick discusses combining storytelling and business.
  • 28:30 If you want people to do business with you, you need to be able to tell stories and to take clients on a journey.
  • 34:10 Owen tells us how we can improve ourselves as storytellers.
  • 39:00 Mastering the art of storytelling is crucial if you want to become a good public speaker.
  • 46:30 According to Owen, men and women in business show confidence in different ways – and that’s OK!
  • 54:00 Owen shares some of the key lessons he’s learned during his travels all around the world.
  • 59:30 Owen Fitzpatrick has seen it all, but his number one favorite place in the world is his home country – Ireland.

220: Chris J “Mohawk” Reed – how to crush it on Linkedin and become a Linkedin Power Profile (Ashley Talks ASH6)

Podcast highlights:

  • 09:13 Why has Linkedin become so important for business owners?
  • 32:14 The elusive LinkedIn Power Profile Award and how to get it
  • 35:18 Chris J Reed’s top tips for entrepreneurs on Linkedin to get engagement – get a headline, use a background picture, personalize your summary section

Podcast notes:

  • 00:05 ASH6 – Ashley Talks with Chris J Reed, hosted by Ashley Galina Dudarenok
  • 00:47 Chris’s journey from being a serial entrepreneur to taking Asian LinkedIn by storm
  • 01:53 Chris’s first introduction sentence – the only CEO with a mohawk
  • 05:53 Were there uncomfortable situations due to Chris’s mohawk and personal branding?
  • 07:11 Why did Chris choose LinkedIn as a platform to focus on? Why double down on Linkedin?
  • 09:13 Why has Linkedin become so important for business owners?
  • 13:50 Transformations in LinkedIn over the past 5 years – being bought by Microsoft and becoming a personal branding, content marketing, social selling engine
  • 15:27 The ‘Publish your own Article’ section in linkedIn and why it is so important
  • 17:30 How can you ‘go viral’ organically on LinkedIn?
  • 22:32 All about Chris’s winning strategy on LinkedIn – the LinkedIn 411 strategy
  • 29:11 The importance of LinkedIn recommendations and how it boosts your algorithm in terms of rankings
  • 32:14 The elusive LinkedIn Power Profile Award and how to get it
  • 35:18 Chris’s top tips for entrepreneurs on LinkedIn to get engagement – get a headline, use a background picture, personalize your summary section
  • 40:08 What is the best way to message people on LinkedIn for the first introduction?
  • 43:16 The 30000 connection limit on LinkedIn and how to get over that limit
  • 45:58 How does Chris convert people to become his followers?
  • 49:18 The story of how Chris tried to hack the algorithm by being a sexy 25 year old woman from Shanghai
  • 50:47 Do not use the LinkedIn personal email database. Why not?
  • 55:20 The nuances between sexes, countries and cultures in the way people use LinkedIn
  • 58:58 A little bit about Chris’s company and why entrepreneurs should use Chris’s services
  • 61:06 Suscribe to the Ashley Talks Podcast to hear more about female entrepreneurship, marketing, personal branding and Asia