322: Harith Bakri – Building Malaysian Event Startup Galaspace

Harith Bakri, Co-Founder of Galaspace, joins us all the way from Kuala Lumpur Malaysia. 19 year old Harith founded this event marketplace while still at college. In this interview, we discuss Harith’s funding plans, how he recruited his team through Habbo Hotel and his strategy to build a community of event planners and consumers.

304: Jan Smejkal aka Your China Guy (Cross Border Kyle KYL9)

Podcast highlights:

  • 04:45 What has Jan seen happen with the “community” in China specific to Startup Grind which grew from 3 or 4 chapters to 25? How did he develop that community?
  • 10:00 Where does Jan see the Shenzhen community today? What does he see happening in that community around startups and entrepreneurship? What’s the pulse?
  • 26:45 Where is China going? With the venture markets and startups taking off, where is this situation going?

Podcast notes:

  • 00:05 Welcome Jan Smejkal aka Your China Guy to Cross Border Kyle with host Kyle Ellicott
  • 01:25 What is Jan aka Your China Guy up to?
  • 02:45 Jan works with Startup Grind. How many chapters does it have now?
  • 04:45 What has Jan seen happen with the “community” in China specific to Startup Grind which grew from 3 or 4 chapters to 25? How did he develop that community?
  • 10:00 Where does Jan see the Shenzhen community today? What does he see happening in that community around startups and entrepreneurship? What’s the pulse?
  • 15:45 A quick sidestory of Kyle in Shenzhen
  • 24:25 How did Jan come up with the name Your China Guy?
  • 26:45 Where is China going? With the venture markets and startups taking off, where is this situation going?
  • 31:10 Kyle advises you should give China a chance
  • 38:00 The number of people traveling in and out of San Francisco alone globally is huge but there’s a lot more activity happening in China
  • 40:25 Jan’s top 3 pieces of advice for first timers landing in China
  • 45:45 Jan’s favourite travel hack
  • 47:00 Who is Jan’s favourite China unicorn?
  • 48:00 Where can someone find more about Startup Grind in China? Go to startupgrind.com/
  • 50:50 Find Jan on twitter.com/yourchinaguy or contact him through email at [email protected]

293: The Growth of Entrepreneurship in Asia (Digital Lives Asia DLA5)

Podcast highlights:

  • 14:30 Simon: it’s interesting to consider how what you see defines the reality you believe in. An exposure to other entrepreneurs early in your life likely gives you the confidence you can do something similar. Digital has changed this so much because we are no longer confined to just looking at the people around us. You can see fascinating stories all over the social media platforms today. Graham: digital then is a great leveler, isn’t it? Look at how women in China can see people around them using these digital platforms. They no longer see the model entrepreneur as someone who is older and male.
  • 39:05 Simon: when it comes to scaling a business, it’s really striking to see the barriers women face in getting access to funding. Graham: in some ways this isn’t surprising given investors tend to back what they know, and what they know is men being successful in business. The challenge in Asia is generational. It will take a generation of entrepreneurs who exit with success and decide to go back in to fund the next crop of people. These will be the investors more likely to back women or non-traditional founders.
  • 44:55 Simon: the theme emerging from our conversation today is there is definitely an energy around entrepreneurship in Asia. A lot of this is just waiting to be activated. What we need to do is find out how to create the cultures to allow this energy to flourish. Graham: it seems the best thing we can do is to tell people’s stories. Help people access inspiration.

Podcast notes:

  • 00:05 DLA7 – Digital Lives Asia with Graham Brown and Simon Kemp
  • 01:00 Graham: Let’s start with the question of where is the most startup-friendly city in Asia today? What city has the best startup to overall population ratio? — Simon: The obvious answer seems like it would be somewhere in China. But this seems too obvious. Let’s say somewhere in Indonesia. Graham: Actually it is in China.
  • 02:37 Graham: The city with the most startups per head is Zhuhai, which is right next door to Hong Kong and Macao and part of the whole Pearl River Delta ecosystem. The level of startup activity in Zhuhai is 10 times higher than in the city with the highest level of startup activity in the US, Miami, Florida.
  • 05:45 Simon: In looking at entrepreneurship in Asia among millennials, Asia does not seem to be suffering the lack of people trying to create things. Graham: if you look at some of the data coming out of places like the US, you see entrepreneurship as a percentage of the overall population has slipped to something like 5%, which is down from the high a generation ago near 10.5%. The data suggest this generation is the least entrepreneurial generation in the US.
  • 08:55 Graham: thinking about why this is the case several things come to mind. First it’s a lot harder in the West to be an entrepreneur. Also people are generally comfortable, so there’s less of a drive to hustle. Simon: the data also show the burden of student debt in the US. It could also be the people with the drive to be entrepreneurs are finding other ways to scratch that itch so to speak. One way they’re doing this is through the gig economy.
  • 14:30 Simon: it’s interesting to consider how what you see defines the reality you believe in. An exposure to other entrepreneurs early in your life likely gives you the confidence you can do something similar. Digital has changed this so much because we are no longer confined to just looking at the people around us. You can see fascinating stories all over the social media platforms today. Graham: digital then is a great leveler, isn’t it? Look at how women in China can see people around them using these digital platforms. They no longer see the model entrepreneur as someone who is older and male.
  • 24:08 Graham: coming back to the subject of megacities in Asia. Looking back at the Zhuhai statistic we opened the show with, we see in Zhuhai there are 2,800 startups per 100,000 people while in Miami, the figure is 247 startups per 100,000. In Shenzhen, 16% of people there are engaged in entrepreneurship. The comparative figure in the United States is only 3.5%. Imagine living in a place where you’re surrounded by these stories all the time. This is what’s happening right now is Asia. There is this compounding effect where entrepreneurs are inspired by other entrepreneurs and want to go to places where a lot of them are.
  • 27:50 Simon: it’s worth unpacking this a bit. There are two side to entrepreneurship: the opportunity side and the necessity side. The businesses we are celebrating today are those on the opportunity side. This happens when people look at the world around them and spot an idea. Traveling around Asia you see so many more opportunities to improve people’s lives than you do when you travel in the West.
  • 32:28 Graham: look at some more facts here. In data from 2012, the highest ratio of male to female entrepreneurship is the UK. Twice as many men than women are entrepreneurs in the UK. In best ratio for gender parity in entrepreneurship is in developing markets in Asia. There are an equal number of male and female entrepreneurs in developing Asia. Simon: this really helps explain one reason to feel so optimistic when we look at these things. Of course there is still a long way to go in order to improve the chances of female entrepreneurs; but it is heartening to see the progress in Asia.
  • 39:05 Simon: when it comes to scaling a business, it’s really striking to see the barriers women face in getting access to funding. Graham: in some ways this isn’t surprising given investors tend to back what they know, and what they know is men being successful in business. The challenge in Asia is generational. It will take a generation of entrepreneurs who exit with success and decide to go back in to fund the next crop of people. These will be the investors more likely to back women or non-traditional founders.
  • 44:55 Simon: the theme emerging from our conversation today is there is definitely an energy around entrepreneurship in Asia. A lot of this is just waiting to be activated. What we need to do is find out how to create the cultures to allow this energy to flourish. Graham: it seems the best thing we can do is to tell people’s stories. Help people access inspiration.

286: Jenny Pan – CarePod (PitchDeck Asia)

Podcast highlights:

  • 06:10 Let’s talk about traveling with pets. Many people don’t understand how difficult it is, correct? — It’s true, many people don’t understand unless they’ve had to travel with their own pets. In a way it’s like the divide between having kids and not having kids. Until you have kids, you don’t know what it’s like. It’s different for every airline; but what tends to happen is there’s a separate cost you pay and you’re required to take your pet to a separate part of the airport for cargo. There’s often no signage and no one to help you as you might expect. Pets are often then left in the cargo warehouse for hours while the flight is prepared and all the passengers go through check-in like normal. This is a very scary and stressful process for them.
  • 16:25 Let’s talk about CarePod. Can you describe what it is? — We’ve developed an entire solution to help people feel better about traveling with their pets. There are essentially two parts: 1) the physical solution and 2) the software side. The pod itself is basically a first class accommodation for pets, designed to help reduce the stress factors they face. We’ve tried to design something that increases airflow and ventilation while reducing the amount of visual and noise stress pets are exposed to. During flight pets are in the cargo hold, which is not accessible to passengers, and not designed for comfort. With the CarePod, we try to maintain a low-intensity environment for pets during the entire duration of travel.
  • 35:15 Who are you looking for then in terms of investors? What sorts of people do you see really understanding what you’re trying to do? — We’ve been surprised by people who get what we’re doing who may not be pet owners themselves. People who, for example, see tech and design as making the world a better place. They’ve approached us and said we like what you’re doing here with better design and better tech. We are also seeing airlines getting it more and more. They realize they need to acquire consumers long-term and they need to cater to a generation who see pets are part of their family and who very much want to travel with their pets.

Podcast notes:

  • 00:05 Welcome Jenny Pan, founder of CarePod, to The Pitch with host host Graham D. Brown.
  • 02:15 Before we talk about CarePod, let’s talk for a moment about Lhasa Apsos. Tell us about them. — Along with Tibetan Mastiffs, which typically guard temples, and the Tibetan Terriers, the Lhasa Apso is a common dog breed in Tibet. The mastiffs were traditionally protectors and were once used to fight lions, whereas the Apsos were lap dogs that resided inside temples. For me there’s always been an interest in dogs and so it was apparent the difficulties involved in flying with pets. It can be a very rough experience for the animals.
  • 06:10 Let’s talk about traveling with pets. Many people don’t understand how difficult it is, correct? — It’s true, many people don’t understand unless they’ve had to travel with their own pets. In a way it’s like the divide between having kids and not having kids. Until you have kids, you don’t know what it’s like. It’s different for every airline; but what tends to happen is there’s a separate cost you pay and you’re required to take your pet to a separate part of the airport for cargo. There’s often no signage and no one to help you as you might expect. Pets are often then left in the cargo warehouse for hours while the flight is prepared and all the passengers go through check-in like normal. This is a very scary and stressful process for them.
  • 12:15 Why is it that airlines still treat pets as cargo despite growing wealth in Asia and more sophisticated pet ownership as people become wealthier? — As passengers, what we don’t see is airlines consider themselves built as both passenger businesses and cargo businesses. There is very much a sense of two different teams. They are two very different entities and the two sides normally do not work very closely together. Pets are the only things that cross the divide between the cargo side and the passenger side.
  • 16:25 Let’s talk about CarePod. Can you describe what it is? — We’ve developed an entire solution to help people feel better about traveling with their pets. There are essentially two parts: 1) the physical solution and 2) the software side. The pod itself is basically a first class accommodation for pets, designed to help reduce the stress factors they face. We’ve tried to design something that increases airflow and ventilation while reducing the amount of visual and noise stress pets are exposed to. During flight pets are in the cargo hold, which is not accessible to passengers, and not designed for comfort. With the CarePod, we try to maintain a low-intensity environment for pets during the entire duration of travel.
  • 23:00 What is the effect on owners when traveling with pets? — When we spoke with pet owners, what they wanted most was peace of mind. They wanted to know airlines were providing the right level of service and care. They also want to know how their pets are doing, which is why we have a tracking element allowing people to see where their CarePod is at all times. 80% of pet owners expressed a desire to us to have this information. Also if you think of all the products airlines fly around, it’s amazing the things they can do. For example with pharmaceuticals, there are all sorts of sophisticated, temperature-controlled transportation options available. We don’t have this for pets. Why not?
  • 27:45 Let’s talk a bit about your business itself. What are the things we need to know about how you’ve gotten to where you are now? — We’ve been doing this for almost four years now. We have taken the time to develop a product to meet the needs of veterinarians, pet owners, and airlines. We have a product ready to go, we’re ready to launch.
  • 29:00 How have you funded this project up until now? — We’ve bootstrapped this for a long time. Basically we’ve self-funded with some good investors. Because we also have a hardware component, it’s a bit more expensive for us than for a purely digital startup. We expect to do a seed round later this year or early next year.
  • 31:45 This is an interesting funding model. Why have you chosen to do things differently than many startups in terms of how you raise money? — We have done some fundraising. What we found difficult was the investor’s mentality in this particular space. When we first got started in 2014, pet travel was just not on people’s radar. Being based out of Singapore, the mentality towards pets was quite different. Pets were still viewed as a status symbol rather than a family member. Things are different in Europe and the US.
  • 35:15 Who are you looking for then in terms of investors? What sorts of people do you see really understanding what you’re trying to do? — We’ve been surprised by people who get what we’re doing who may not be pet owners themselves. People who, for example, see tech and design as making the world a better place. They’ve approached us and said we like what you’re doing here with better design and better tech. We are also seeing airlines getting it more and more. They realize they need to acquire consumers long-term and they need to cater to a generation who see pets are part of their family and who very much want to travel with their pets.

244: Daniel Fraser – Building Smiling Albino Travel and Becoming a Thai TV Celebrity

Podcast highlights:

  • 28:02 Daniel’s experiences of being a ‘white guy’ entrepreneur in Thailand back in 1999, from being in a rare club to living locally
  • 41:00 The new trend of luxury adventure travel and how it incorporates authentic local experiences
  • 54:42 Daniel’s advice for listeners thinking about coming to Asia. What does it take to be successful when leaving one world and starting in another?

Podcast notes:

  • 00:05 Welcome Daniel Fraser to Asia Tech Podcast Stories, hosted by Graham Brown
  • 00:53 Daniel’s first time in Asia in 1995 in a student exhange with the Thai Royal Family
  • 04:54 Graham’s experience when he came to Asia in the summer of 1995
  • 07:17 Being neither expat nor tourist – how Daniel’s first year in Thailand was a complete immersion in local Thai culture
  • 10:23 The second coming. Why did Daniel come back to Asia in 1999?
  • 13:49 Why did Daniel take the risk to build a business based on adventure travel and experience travel back in 1999?
  • 17:10 Daniel’s story of coming back to Thailand in 1999 and the first few years, from oddjobs to tourist visa runs
  • 20:08 Thailand is now derisked compared to what it was. What was it like back then to start a business in Thailand as a foreigner?
  • 23:33 How did Daniel deal with the ‘dark entrepreneurial days’, days when he felt like buying a flight ticket and going home?
  • 26:08 The fear of failure as a powerful motivator and how publicly stating your intentions will help entrepreneurs
  • 28:02 Daniel’s experiences of being a ‘white guy’ entrepreneur in Thailand back in 1999, from being in a rare club to living locally
  • 32:23 The tours initially offered by Daniel’s adventure travel agency, from unexpectedly popular motorcycle tours to putting millionaires in little guesthouses in Northern Thailand
  • 37:10 Travel is about bridging worlds. All of the tours offered in the early days of the business came directly from the life Daniel was living at that time
  • 41:00 The new trend of luxury adventure travel and how it incorporates authentic local experiences
  • 43:07 Daniel’s stint on Thai TV, hosting a travel culture documentary series ‘Long Rat Yim’ in the Thai language
  • 47:05 How did Thai people react to a white guy talking about their culture and their country on TV?
  • 49:34 How Asian countries like Thailand are starting to see themselves from a global perspective
  • 51:30 All about planning to be lucky and how actually going somewhere would create an energy to seek out opportunities
  • 54:42 Daniel’s advice for listeners thinking about coming to Asia. What does it take to be successful when leaving one world and starting in another?
  • 59:00 Get in touch with Daniel through his travel company Smiling Albino, facebook Daniel B Fraser, or watch him on the Thai TV program ‘Long Rat Yim’ on Channel 3SD every Sunday evening at 4.30pm

243: Julian Kwan – Investacrowd (Founders in Asia FIA3)

Podcast highlights:

  • 12:00 How did Julian Kwan get started in Singapore? It’s the best place to start a property tech business. Thinking where the investment comes from is critical
  • 24:25 The huge sense of belief and 150% conviction that you need to have in starting a business. The dilemma startups face with an idea that’s too early for the market (like real estate token exchanges)
  • 39:50 Asian companies don’t support startups like Western companies do. Raising money from traditional sources is much harder in Asia than in The West – but is this situation changing in recent years?

Podcast notes:

  • 00:05 Welcome Julian Kwan to Asia Tech Podcast Founders in Asia with Jodie Collins
  • 01:25 How did Julian Kwan get into Asia? A backstory on Julian backpacking in and around Asia, studying in Beijing, then working in Shanghai on different jobs before moving onto real estate development and renovating a prosthetics factory in Shanghai
  • 06:35 Did Julian have any local partner to work with in the renovation of the prosthetics factory project? Turning it to a hotel, raising money from a big American entrepreneur, opening it, eventually signing up a couple of deals with real estate developers in China then expanding into other parts of Asia
  • 08:50 Did Julian move to Sri Lanka permanently for a project there? The challenges Julian faced in doing business at Sri Lanka
  • 12:00 How did Julian Kwan get started in Singapore? It’s the best place to start a property tech business. Thinking where the investment comes from is critical
  • 15:05 What is Investacrowd? A real-estate financing company, a tech platform where global investors can access high-quality commercial real-estate investments – a diversification tool
  • 17:35 Did Julian develop the Investacrowd technology in Singapore? Expansion plans into adopting the blockchain technology and the shareholdings into the smart contracts instead of old paper contracts
  • 20:50 How did Julian develop the idea behind Investacrowd? What was his inspiration for starting the business and how did Julian transition from idea to making it happen?
  • 24:25 The huge sense of belief and 150% conviction that you need to have in starting a business. The dilemma startups face with an idea that’s too early for the market (like real estate token exchanges)
  • 28:20 Does Julian see ICTX (Investacrowd Token), an extension of the Investacrowd business, as a pivot away from what he is doing?
  • 30:25 As the CEO, how does Julian balance out his team in terms of where their focus is on the existing business versus the new business? And how are the “old-world” real estate companies moving into the blockchain space?
  • 35:55 Being a business founder now working in an area that is moving at an extremely fast pace, how does Julian manage that from a health and time perspective?
  • 39:50 Asian companies don’t support startups like Western companies do. Raising money from traditional sources is much harder in Asia than in The West – but is this situation changing in recent years?
  • 42:35 Where are the most interesting markets for property technology in Asia?
  • 44:30 Julian’s tips for founders who are looking to move or are interested in Asia – find and go what’s behind the curve; work in an accelerator or VC fund, see all the different things and come up with something of your own; understand the cost space; play the long game otherwise people won’t work with you

239: Fredrik Haren (Ashley Talks ASH9)

Podcast highlights:

  • 12:50 “Humanity to the power of ideas” – Fredrik’s inner theme which means believing in the potential of humanity and the power of ideas. If every human being reached their maximum potential and learn to share it, the world will be a better place
  • 24:45 What was the thing Fredrik learned that was really eye-opening or changed everything for him? Open up your brain to all ideas of doing something out there and select the best way instead of basing it on what you think historically, where you were born or what your passport is
  • 42:30 “A minute to learn, a lifetime to master”. How can one be good at professional speaking? The ones who make it speak from the heart and to be able to speak from your heart, you need to know your “inner theme”

Podcast notes:

  • 00:05 ASH9 with Fredrik Haren – Ashley Talks with Ashley Galina Dudarenok
  • 00:10 Welcome Fredrik Haren, author and professional speaker, to Ashley Talks
  • 01:00 How did it all happen for Fredrik? Publishing his first book and starting an internet company in 1995, selling it in 1999 before the dot-com bust, deciding to write and speak about creativity since 2000, moving to Beijing in 2005, before settling in Singapore in 2008, the most global place on Earth
  • 09:40 What are the most important or in-demand topics that people want Fredrik to talk about? The aspects of creativity and learning about the differences in creativity between developed and developing countries
  • 12:50 “Humanity to the power of ideas” – Fredrik’s inner theme which means believing in the potential of humanity and the power of ideas. If every human being reached their maximum potential and learn to share it, the world will be a better place
  • 15:40 With the rise of AI, how does Fredrik see creativity as something that humanity still holds on to? Can these algorithms be more creative and do it better?
  • 19:05 The use of technology to widen our world and connect all of mankind, and its effect to come 20 years from now
  • 23:05 How can people go from a nationalistic to a global mentality and enjoy the huge advantage now of people like the digital nomads who understood the digital change 15, 20 years ago? Travel the world, connect with more people. read news from many different countries
  • 24:45 What was the thing Fredrik learned that was really eye-opening or changed everything for him? Open up your brain to all ideas of doing something out there and select the best way instead of basing it on what you think historically, where you were born or what your passport is
  • 30:45 The whole idea of growing is to widen your horizons, the human dream of wanting to have a good life for me, my family, the society and the world, and his living on an island leading to him becoming very aware that everything is connected
  • 37:45 How does one start in the professional speaking industry? Who can become a professional speaker and who needs one? The professional speaking industry in Asia is in its infancy but it will be the biggest in 20 years
  • 42:30 “A minute to learn, a lifetime to master”. How can one be good at professional speaking? The ones who make it speak from the heart and to be able to speak from your heart, you need to know your “inner theme”
  • 47:35 What would be Fredrik’s advice to startup speakers? You need to find your own speaking essence by thinking about the 3 things people say to you after they hear you speak. Also, check out Fredrik’s new book “Spread Your Message. See the world. How to Become a Global Keynote Speaker”
  • 51:30 Find out more about Fredrik Haren at interesting.org, professionalspeaking.com and innertheme.com

225: Asia’s $36 Trillion A2A Market (Asia Matters)

Podcast highlights:

  • 07:10 The A2A Metatrend – Asia to Asia trade. Asia now does more trade with itself than the rest of the world. The Asian Middle classes will be worth $36 trillion by 2030
  • 34:52 Why Asian brands have a massive advantage over Western competition. This is bad news for Amazon, especially in high growth markets such as Southeast Asia.
  • 73:20 The rising power of the middle class in Asia and how it is going to shape the future of key sectors like automotive

Podcast notes:

  • 00:05 ATP610 – Asia Matters with Graham D Brown on the biggest growth opportunity of the next 10 years
  • 01:05 The phenomenon of Bakugai or ‘explosive shopping’, a Japanese description of how Chinese tourists go shopping in Tokyo
  • 05:44 Going way back to when the Americans turned up in Europe
  • 07:10 The A2A Metatrend. Asia to Asia trade, projected to be a 36 trillion dollar market by 2030
  • 09:25 The construction of the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge and its potential implications
  • 16:36 The explosion of wealthy middle classed Asians over the next 10 years and its possible influence on world trade with Asia
  • 19:04 A comparison of Asia’s economy back in the 80s to what it is today, from Japan’s growth to China’s technological advancements
  • 27:43 An example of growth – bike-sharing startups are facing steep competition in Shanghai
  • 29:05 An overview of the A2A (Asia to Asia) market in terms of what it is today
  • 34:52 Why Asian brands have a massive advantage over Western competition
  • 44:25 Asian brands are using personal information data to optimise the retail experience as mentioned in the second AshleyTalks podcast
  • 46:42 There is access to large markets in Asia as a short flight from Singapore gives you access to half the world’s population
  • 48:25 There are smaller time zone differences within Asian countries compared to the West. Sounds trivial, but this has a big difference in ongoing communication
  • 49:24 Physical connectivity within the Greater Bay and Asia, from the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge to China’s One Belt One Road project
  • 53:30 The power of the Bamboo Network in Asia – interconnected Chinese families across Asia
  • 55:40 Western companies are going to find it a lot harder in Asia as their honeymoon period wears off
  • 58:58 Graham forecasts that in the next 5 to 10 years, Asian brands are going to take on Western competition on their home turf. We’re already seeing this with Alibaba.
  • 60:35 Rapid advancements in Artificial Intelligence (AI) in China and Asia
  • 63:55 Lessons from the automotive industry. If you look at automotive you see a recurring pattern in history – success isn’t based on disruptive innovation but from one country borrowing (or stealing) the ideas of another. Today in China it’s no different.
  • 67:05 The Lean Startup methodology in entrepreneurship and its history. Lean Startup owes a lot to a fusion of ideas from East and West
  • 73:20 The rising power of the middle class in Asia and how it is going to shape the future of key sectors like automotive

219: Nitin Sawhney – Reboot Life, Discover Asia

Podcast highlights:

  • 17:30 Remote workers are more productive and efficient, and less likely to change jobs than office workers – companies can save costs employing remote workers according to studies
  • 32:25 The “I’ll get around to traveling the world someday” thinking – challenging the dominant mode of thinking and take a leap of faith regarding the digital nomad lifestyle
  • 40:05 What is Reboot Life’s program? Can you live a life you don’t even know you want right now?

Podcast notes:

  • 00:05 Welcome Nitin Sawhney to Asia Tech Podcast Stories
  • 01:05 An introduction to Reboot Life – a remote work and travel program for people who want to take a step back and reevaluate their goals
  • 04:05 The 12 cities Reboot Life is heading to – Bali, Indonesia – Chiang Mai, Thailand – Istanbul, Turkey – Budapest, Hungary – Split, Croatia – Leipzig, Germany – Serbia – Spain – Dubai, UAE – Cape Town, South Africa – Wellington, New Zealand – Melbourne, Australia – Tokyo, Japan
  • 08:00 Why Bali and Chiang Mai? Because they are the digital nomad capitals of the world
  • 12:30 In Bali – independent villa with a terrace and private infinity pool overlooking the rice fields and in-house cafe plus the importance of working in a public instead of the groups’ own private coworking space
  • 14:25 Are people actually getting work done? The criticism of Reboot Life as an around the world trip dressed up as work and discipline as key to maintaining a digital nomad lifestyle
  • 17:30 Remote workers are more productive and efficient, and less likely to change jobs than office workers – companies can save costs employing remote workers according to studies
  • 20:45 How important is it being surrounded by really positive and motivated people and location-independence as the default position of work in the future
  • 24:10 Does it take a certain type of mindset to be productive in a remote-work environment?
  • 27:55 Where did the idea of Reboot Life come from? A backstory to how the program started – combining work AND travel instead of work OR travel
  • 32:25 The “I’ll get around to traveling the world someday” thinking – challenging the dominant mode of thinking and take a leap of faith regarding the digital nomad lifestyle
  • 37:25 What does Nitin hope that changes inside of people who go through Reboot Life? When does the light switch moment happen for individuals who are part of the program?
  • 40:05 What is Reboot Life’s program? Can you live a life you don’t even know you want right now?
  • 43:30 The state of the digital nomad scene in India: changes in the coworking spaces in India as well as the number of Indians living the lifestyle
  • 50:15 Please check out Reboot Life at www.reboot-life.com
  • 211: Asia’s Amazing Airports and the Launchpad Expo Hong Kong (Cross Border Kyle KYL4)

    Podcast highlights:

    • 09:00 When it comes to people-flow and experience, Asian airports are years ahead of their counterparts in The US and Europe.
    • 26:00 How do you manage your schedule and make best use of your time when you go to a multi-day conference like Launchpad HK?
    • 33:15 The challenge is on… We are roughly scheduled to podcast April 9th at Hong Kong Airport. Are we going to be in the mood? Is it logistically possible?

    Podcast notes:

    • 00:05 KYL4 – Cross Border Kyle with Kyle Ellicott
    • 00:20 Intro to hooking up at Hong Kong Airport
    • 01:20 Getting stuck at Beijing Airport during Typhoon season
    • 01:45 What’s going on at the Startup Launchpad conference Hong Kong?
    • 04:20 Surviving a 4 day expo
    • 07:00 Flying SFO (US) and HND (Japan) to HKG for breakfast
    • 07:50 Living at airports in Asia. Could you take up residence?
    • 09:00 When it comes to people-flow and experience, Asian airports are years ahead of their counterparts in The US and Europe.
    • 10:30 Shanghai Pudong (PVG) airport is crazy! If you get the wrong terminal, you could end up walking miles.
    • 12:00 The growth in Asian travel means an explosion of airport traffic. Beijing and Hong Kong are expanding fast.
    • 13:00 There are countries where it’s so much trouble getting through immigration and dealing with the paperwork that entrepreneurs are choosing not to do business there
    • 15:00 Entrepreneur airport hacks. Can you live out of a carry-on case for 4 weeks on business? What do you do about showering at airports?
    • 17:10 Business travel like a pro – fly overnight and land in the morning.
    • 19:00 Reprogramming your rhythms to manage time zone challenges messing with your mind
    • 23:20 Flying into Hong Kong – what gets you excited about the city?
    • 26:00 How do you manage your schedule and make best use of your time when you go to a multi-day conference like Launchpad HK?
    • 30:15 Best coworking spaces and meeting spaces for your flying visit to Hong Kong
    • 31:50 It’s easy to go to a big conference expo and blow the opportunity by not planning your schedule ahead of time
    • 33:15 The challenge is on… We are roughly scheduled to podcast April 9th at Hong Kong Airport. Are we going to be in the mood? Is it logistically possible?
    • 35:00 Sneak preview of future episodes of Cross Border Kyle and how to meet Kyle at the Launchpad show